Here Comes the Sun

Jules,16. The Beatles, George Harrison, 1960s.
Keeping calm and carrying on since June 13th, 2011
thateventuality:

George’s contribution to Lorne Adrain’s book “The Most Important Thing I Know”

thateventuality:

George’s contribution to Lorne Adrain’s book “The Most Important Thing I Know”

soundsof71:

George Harrison at John Lennon’s house for the Imagine sessions, 1971. (That’s John behind George, producer Phil Spector in the doorway, and Rod Lynton on acoustic guitar.)

soundsof71:

George Harrison at John Lennon’s house for the Imagine sessions, 1971. (That’s John behind George, producer Phil Spector in the doorway, and Rod Lynton on acoustic guitar.)

(via storiesofmysoul)

wonderfultonightuncensored:

Yet when a friend once asked me whether I would have swapped the passion of my relationship with Eric for a more gentle love, the answer was no. It was like hitching a ride on a shooting star: a fantastic experience that caused immense pain, but I’m glad I had it. -Pattie Boyd  (excerpt from a Daily Mail article)

wonderfultonightuncensored:

Yet when a friend once asked me whether I would have swapped the passion of my relationship with Eric for a more gentle love, the answer was no. It was like hitching a ride on a shooting star: a fantastic experience that caused immense pain, but I’m glad I had it. -Pattie Boyd
(excerpt from a Daily Mail article)

(via impattieboyd)

thateventuality:

Dhani and George Harrison
Photo: Richard Young/Rex Features

Sunday, 1 August 1999: “In Henley-on-Thames, George upsets his neighbors when he throws a 21st birthday party for his son, Dhani. The quiet Beatle decides to mark this historic occasion by staging a 15-minute fireworks display on the grounds of his Friar Park home. But unfortunately, local environmental health officials will soon claim that they had received a large number of complaints about the events, saying: ‘The show terrified children and animals for miles around.’ As the fireworks lit up the sky, car alarms went off, debris fell onto gardens and windows rattled. Mrs Peggy Leonard, from nearby Hop Gardens, says: ‘Suddenly, without warning, we were subjected to a most frightening display right overhead. Debris was falling into our gardens and one dreads to think what would have been the outcome had a spark set light to tinder dry grass or trees. What on earth has happened to our nice, peaceful town?’ The health officials write to George informing him of the complaints.” - The Beatles Diary Volume 2: After The Break-Up 1970-2001

thateventuality:

Dhani and George Harrison

Photo: Richard Young/Rex Features

Sunday, 1 August 1999: “In Henley-on-Thames, George upsets his neighbors when he throws a 21st birthday party for his son, Dhani. The quiet Beatle decides to mark this historic occasion by staging a 15-minute fireworks display on the grounds of his Friar Park home. But unfortunately, local environmental health officials will soon claim that they had received a large number of complaints about the events, saying: ‘The show terrified children and animals for miles around.’ As the fireworks lit up the sky, car alarms went off, debris fell onto gardens and windows rattled. Mrs Peggy Leonard, from nearby Hop Gardens, says: ‘Suddenly, without warning, we were subjected to a most frightening display right overhead. Debris was falling into our gardens and one dreads to think what would have been the outcome had a spark set light to tinder dry grass or trees. What on earth has happened to our nice, peaceful town?’ The health officials write to George informing him of the complaints.” - The Beatles Diary Volume 2: After The Break-Up 1970-2001

(via harrisonstories)

thateventuality:


The following is an excerpt (pertaining to The Beatles, and George in particular) typed up from a digital copy of Lewis H. Lapham’s article - “There Once Was A Guru From Rishikesh” - published in two parts (4 May and 18 May 1968) in the Saturday Evening Post. This excerpt comes from the 18 May issue; as it’s a lengthy read, it’s under a “read more” cut.

"To the Beatles the Maharishi attributed the popular success of his spiritual-regeneration movement, and he doted on them with the proud fondness of a singing teacher or football coach. Often he referred to them as ‘the blessed leaders of the world’s youth,’ and in his happiest moments he described George Harrison as ‘a sublime soul for whom God and all the angels give thanks.’

Read More

thateventuality:

The following is an excerpt (pertaining to The Beatles, and George in particular) typed up from a digital copy of Lewis H. Lapham’s article - “There Once Was A Guru From Rishikesh” - published in two parts (4 May and 18 May 1968) in the Saturday Evening Post. This excerpt comes from the 18 May issue; as it’s a lengthy read, it’s under a “read more” cut.

"To the Beatles the Maharishi attributed the popular success of his spiritual-regeneration movement, and he doted on them with the proud fondness of a singing teacher or football coach. Often he referred to them as ‘the blessed leaders of the world’s youth,’ and in his happiest moments he described George Harrison as ‘a sublime soul for whom God and all the angels give thanks.’

Read More